The Other I

September 30, 2014

Update on the no-sugar regime

Filed under: Just Stuff — theotheri @ 8:21 pm

When I was a growing up, we all routinely made Lenten resolutions covering those six weeks from Ash Wednesday to Easter.  My childhood resolutions usually took the form of giving up candy or cookies or even desserts altogether, and as I recall, I rarely broke the resolutions.

As an adult, I have often wondered why I haven’t been able to go for as long as two days to keep a resolution to stay away from sugar, when I did so with so little fanfare as a child.

I’m now into the third week of a no-refined sugar regime, and there are a few things that have surprised me.

First of all, as Sanstorm in her comment predicted, it has not been nearly as hard as I have expected.  When I have felt a sugar-craving, I’ve usually reached for a small handful of raisins and nuts, and moved on.  What I have not done is to continue to discuss the issue with myself.  I have not gone down the increasingly self-serving reasons about why, despite my resolutions, I simply should have a sugar-kick.  It’s rather like the Lenten resolutions of my childhood.  The decision is not up for discussion.

The second thing that has surprised me is that, although my joints are not absolutely pain-free — especially after I’ve spent a couple of hours scraping moss off the roof — I seem to have a lot more energy.  I absolutely never expected that.  But it seems to be true.

And of course, having more energy, especially at my age when I am aware of its decreasing supply, is absolutely fantastic.

I had no intention of giving up refined sugar forever.  But under the circumstances, I think I might.

PS:  I do have one small confession to make in the face of this proclamation of victory:  one day I broke down and consumed two fruit-and-nut bars.  To the tune of about 1000 calories.  I felt great for about five minutes.  (But it did taste fantastic.)

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5 Comments »

  1. Great going!

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    Comment by tskraghu — October 1, 2014 @ 1:59 am | Reply

    • Thank you! It’s only two weeks — but it feels like a great step forward. I would guess you understand.

      Like

      Comment by theotheri — October 1, 2014 @ 8:48 pm | Reply

      • My problem is with those tasty crackers kind of stuff. I tell myself it’s not me, the real devil is the large doses of insulin that make me do it!

        . .

        Like

        Comment by tskraghu — October 2, 2014 @ 3:44 am

  2. Lenten resolutions were just another flock control edict. The daily resolutions I have made in adulthood have aimed at a attaining a preferred lifestyle. I stopped the unnecessary consumption of both salt and sugar when training for football matches. Adequate supplies are natural in more healthy foodstuffs. I ate too much processed food. I now eat the occasional Chicken Kiev mainly because I am too lazy to prepare one from scratch! I smoked – I gave up smoking for several ” six week trials” until I saw the folly of this. I am now in my 30th year of abstinence! I do not miss sweets and toffees, cakes or biscuits being part of my every day diet. However even now I cannot eat the English national dish of fish and chips with lashings of salt and vinegar! It has now become a rare treat instead of a weekly Friday ritual.

    Like

    Comment by lairdglencairn — October 1, 2014 @ 8:44 am | Reply

    • Your list of accomplishments is impressive! It sounds as if we both think it’s worth the effort.

      Re Lenten resolutions: I agree that they were a “flock control edict”. But for me at least, keeping Lenten resolutions as a child had an unintended side benefit. It gave me confidence in my ability to make my own decisions about my own behavior. I suspect I am not unique in that outcome when I look at the number of people who no longer consider themselves bound to follow the strictures of their childhood religion.

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      Comment by theotheri — October 1, 2014 @ 8:55 pm | Reply


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