The Other I

July 11, 2013

An aging day

Filed under: Growing Old — theotheri @ 4:09 pm
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As I’ve said before, I’m finding that for me growing old is a surprisingly fascinating experience which mostly I am enjoying.

Aging does have its down sides, however.  I have to arrange my day differently so that I don’t run out of energy to do what I’ve committed to get done.  And I forget words with an annoying frequency.

What I don’t do very often is lose things.  That’s not because my memory is so brilliant, but because I’m compulsively organized.  Things have a place, and most of the time that’s where I put them.

Which is why I suppose I have never before in my life lost my car keys.

But three days ago I couldn’t find my keys or the attached fob that operates the alarm… 

And the car was locked and the burglar alarm was on.  I was able to use my spare key to open the door, but the battery in the fob which turns the alarm off was flat.  So I’m sitting in the car frantically pushing buttons before the entire neighbourhood is running over to tell me I have a problem.  I already knew I had a problem all right as I desperately paged through the car manual which helpfully told me that the ONLY way to turn off the alarm is with the fob.

Finally, with the alarm still blaring, I jumped into Peter’s car and drove to our local garage where we have our cars serviced.  He changed the battery in the fob for me, and said that should at least give me enough peace to find the lost keys.

That was three days ago.

But the problem, I have discovered, with having a place for everything, is that one soon runs out of obvious places to look when something isn’t where it belongs.  I’ve been through drawers, under chairs, through the trash, under the car, in the workshop, even under our mattress.  I can’t think of any more obvious places to search.  I’ve even run out of the impossible places to look.

I have two hypotheses left.  Did someone walk in and lift the car keys?  This is about ten times less likely than my winning the lottery.  Besides, if they lifted the keys, why didn’t they take the 14-year-old car, which is worth all of $250 on the open market?  So I’m not contacting the police with my problem.

The second possibility is that the keys were somehow dropped into the trash which, unfortunately, was picked up the morning before I realized they were gone.

So today I finally phoned the dealer to order a new key and fob which is uniquely coded to operate only the burglar alarm on the car.  The cost is about $250.

I think it’s the kind of thing that speeds up the aging process.

Still, it could be an awfully lot worse, couldn’t it?  I won’t say I actually feel lucky.

But in my heart of hearts, I know I am.

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6 Comments »

  1. I have a key hook behind the kitchen door.

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    Comment by lairdglencairn — July 12, 2013 @ 7:15 am | Reply

    • So you know what it felt like when my key wasn’t where I always put it. I guess we’ve all been there at some point in our lives.

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      Comment by theotheri — July 18, 2013 @ 8:36 pm | Reply

  2. I find that the old Pennsylvania Dutch saying of: “The hurrier I go, the behinder I get” best describes where I am in the aging process. I used to be super (color-coded) organized and I’m slowly losing that compunction. Car keys are a necessity I believe, but I’m finding somethings just don’t matter that much anymore. For example, the EXACT backing for a particular earring…..ah wisdom! Caite

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    Comment by caite — July 13, 2013 @ 6:27 am | Reply

    • Oh wonderful! “The hurrier I go…” I will remember that — no doubt it will appear at some point again in this very blog. Much more creative than my prosaic “less is more.”

      I too have discarded my need to have matching earring backings. I was just grateful that I managed to salvage the front piece as it slithered to follow its backing down the tub drain while I was washing my hair last week.

      I am now, however, rather driven to start going through my drawers and shelves to give away/recycle/trash all those things I have not used or worn for at least ten years. It seems unfair to leave it all behind for my survivors to clean up after me. Are you plagued by anything similar?

      Terry

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      Comment by Terry Sissons — July 13, 2013 @ 12:47 pm | Reply

  3. Upon further reflection, you are absolutely right about going through our material things as we get older. We recently sold my moms’ home and as fate would have it, the house was sold as is, meaning everything went with it. At first I was upset, then I realized that everything I really needed was stored in my heart—memories of holidays past, good times with family etc.. I would much rather remember my one and only childhood home in my heart than have boxes and boxes to go through and wonder what to do with! I do have a few things to pass on to my children and hopefully these items will have meaning to my children and grandchildren. It’s the memories that count, not the “things”! Thanks, Terri, for your ever present wisdom!

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    Comment by caite — July 18, 2013 @ 10:47 am | Reply

    • Well, let us hope it’s wisdom you are thanking me for and not an obsessive neatness — which admittedly no one has ever accused me of. If it is wisdom, I hope it’s that kind of deep wisdom that is embedded in life. Like the tree knowing it’s time to let go of all its leaves. Like knowing that it’s, as you say, not “things,” that give value to our lives – even if its a whole house full of stuff.

      Easier to say sometimes, I admit, than actually letting go. But I’m always so glad when I do.

      Thank you for reminding me. Terry

      On Thu, Jul 18, 2013 at 11:47 AM, The Other I

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      Comment by Terry Sissons — July 18, 2013 @ 7:16 pm | Reply


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